Category: Inorganic

Category: Inorganic

Category: Inorganic

Download Zinc catalysis : applications in organic synthesis by Stephan Enthaler, Xiao-Feng Wu PDF

By Stephan Enthaler, Xiao-Feng Wu

Filling the space available in the market for complete insurance of this scorching subject, this well timed e-book covers quite a lot of natural modifications, e. g. discounts of unsaturated compounds, oxidation reactions, Friedel-Crafts reactions, hydroamination reactions, depolymerizations, alterations of carbon dioxide, oxidative coupling reactions, in addition to C-C, C-N, and C-O bond formation reactions. A bankruptcy on the Read more...

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Filling the space available in the market for finished insurance of this sizzling subject, this well timed e-book covers a variety of natural differences, e.g. Read more...

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Category: Inorganic

Download Mechanisms of Inorganic and Organometallic Reactions Volume by M. V. Twigg (auth.), M. V. Twigg (eds.) PDF

By M. V. Twigg (auth.), M. V. Twigg (eds.)

The target of Mechanisms of Inorganic and Organometallic Reactions is to supply an ongoing serious evaluation of the literature excited about the mechanisms of reactions of inorganic and organometallic compounds. the focus is on reactions in resolution, even though reliable kingdom and gasoline section stories are incorporated the place they supply suitable mechanistic perception. every one quantity covers an eighteen month literature interval, and this, the 7th quantity within the sequence, bargains with papers released in the course of July 1988 via December 1989. the place acceptable, there are references to past paintings, and likewise to precise sections in past volumes. insurance maintains to span the entire sector as comprehensively as attainable in each one quantity, and even though it is most unlikely be completely entire, each attempt is made to incorporate the entire very important for it to released paintings that's proper to the elucidation of response mechanisms. Numerical facts are pronounced within the devices utilized by the unique authors, and they're basically switched over to universal devices whilst making comparisons. the elemental layout of prior volumes is retained to facilitate tracing development over a number of years in a specific subject; this may now be performed for greater than a decade worthy of analysis. within the final quantity, ligand reactivity of either coordination and organometallic compounds have been introduced jointly in bankruptcy 12, and, in accordance with a number of confident reviews from readers, this association has been maintained. there were a few related feedback approximately oscillating reactions, and this subject could have a separate part within the subsequent volume.

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Category: Inorganic

Download Inorganic Synthesis, Vol. 34 by John R. Shapley PDF

By John R. Shapley

This sequence offers inorganic chemists with precise and foolproof techniques for the coaching of vital and well timed compounds. quantity 34 keeps to document such techniques with an up to date collection of contributions by way of internationally-recognized researchers, together with the subsequent:

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Category: Inorganic

Download Inorganic syntheses. by Dimitri Coucouvanis PDF

By Dimitri Coucouvanis

The volumes during this carrying on with sequence offer a compilation of present innovations and ideas in inorganic artificial chemistry. contains inorganic polymer syntheses and practise of significant inorganic solids, syntheses utilized in the advance of pharmacologically lively inorganic compounds, small-molecule coordination complexes, and similar compounds. additionally comprises useful info on transition organometallic compounds together with species with metal-metal cluster molecules. All syntheses provided right here were confirmed. learn more... content material: INORGANIC SYNTHESES; Preface; CONTENTS; Foreword through Roger Adams; bankruptcy I; bankruptcy II; bankruptcy III; bankruptcy IV; bankruptcy V; bankruptcy VI; bankruptcy VII; bankruptcy VIII; bankruptcy IX; topic Index; Index of members. summary: The volumes during this carrying on with sequence offer a compilation of present options and concepts in inorganic artificial chemistry. contains inorganic polymer syntheses and guidance of significant inorganic solids, syntheses utilized in the improvement of pharmacologically lively inorganic compounds, small-molecule coordination complexes, and similar compounds. additionally comprises worthy details on transition organometallic compounds together with species with metal-metal cluster molecules. All syntheses provided the following were established

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Category: Inorganic

Category: Inorganic

Download Nonmetals (Periodic Table of the Elements) by Monica Halka PDF

By Monica Halka

Fabrics which are bad conductors of electrical energy are quite often thought of nonmetals. One vital use of nonmetals is the power to insulate opposed to present stream. The Earths surroundings consists of nonmetallic parts, yet lightning can holiday down the electron bonds and make allowance large voltages to make their strategy to the floor. Water in its natural shape is nonmetallic, although it often comprises impurities referred to as electrolytes that let for an electrical box.

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Category: Inorganic

Category: Inorganic

Download Inorganic Reactions and Methods: Formation of Bonds to O, S, by J. J. Zuckerman, A. D. Norman PDF

By J. J. Zuckerman, A. D. Norman

Boasting quite a few business functions, inorganic chemistry types the foundation for study into new fabrics and bioinorganic compounds similar to calcium that act as organic catalysts. Now entire, this hugely acclaimed sequence offers present wisdom in all components of inorganic chemistry, together with chemistry of the weather; organometallic, polymeric and solid-state fabrics; and compounds suitable to bioinorganic chemistry.Content:
Chapter 3.7.1 advent (pages 1–2): A. D. Norman and W. S. Durfee
Chapter 3.7.2.1.2 through Addition to Low?Valent and Unsaturated steel Complexes (pages 2–3): H. B. Abrahamson
Chapter 3.7.2.1.3 through Insertion Into Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 3–4): W. S. Durfee
Chapter 3.7.2.2 From Water and Alcohols (page 4): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.7.2.2.2 through Hydrolysis or Alcoholysis of Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 4–6): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.7.2.3 From Hydrogen Peroxide and natural Peroxides (pages 6–7): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.7.2.3.2 through Oxidation of the Ligands Coordinated to the Metals (page 7): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.7.2.4 From impartial Oxygen Donor Ligands [Ethers, Aldehydes, Ketones, Pyridine N?Oxides, Phosphine Oxides, Arsine Oxides, and Dialkyl(Aryl) Sulfoxides] (pages 7–8): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.7.2.4.2 by means of Insertion into the Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 8–9): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.7.2.5 From Bidentate and Polydentate Oxygen Donor Ligands (From Polyethers and Crown Ethers, Macrocycles, 2,4?Pentanedione, etc.) (pages 9–10): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.7.2.6 From Oxides of the most staff components (pages 10–11): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.7.2.6.2 through response with Complexes of the Metals (page 11): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.7.2.6.3 via Insertion into Metal?Ligand Bonds (page 11): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.7.2.7 From OH?, OR?, O22, O?2 (pages 11–12): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.7.2.7.2 by way of Oxidation of the Metals and their Complexes (page 12): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.7.2.8 through steel Atom and comparable Reactions (pages 12–14): ok. J. Klabunde
Chapter 3.7.3 Formation of the Bond among Sulfur and a bunch IB or IIB aspect (pages 14–15): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.1.2 via response with steel Complexes (page 15): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.2 From Hydrogen Sulfide, Hydrogen Polysulfides, and Thiols (pages 15–18): J. P. Fackler and ok. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.3 From Thiocarbonyls, Thioethers, natural Polysulfides, and different Sulfur Donor Ligands (pages 18–19): J. P. Fackler and ok. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.4 From natural Thio Acids and different Thio Acids of major workforce parts (pages 19–20): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.4.2 by way of Ligand alternative Reactions with Complexes of the Metals and by way of Sulfur Atom Abstraction (pages 20–21): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.5 From Bidentate and Polydentate Sulfur Donor Atoms (pages 21–22): J. P. Fackler and ok. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.5.2 via Ligand Substitution Reactions (page 22): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.7.3.6 From Sulfur Containing Anions (S2?, S2?, [HS?], [RS]?) (pages 22–27): P. F. Brandt and T. B. Rauchfuss
Chapter 3.7.3.7 by means of steel Atom and comparable Reactions (page 28): okay. J. Klabunde
Chapter 3.7.4 Formation of the Bond among Selenium, Tellurium, and Polonium and crew IB or IIB parts (pages 28–30): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.1.2 Formation of the Bond with Tellurium (pages 30–32): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.1.3 Electrolytic Reactions among the weather (page 32): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.2 by way of response with crew IB or IIB steel Compounds (pages 33–34): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.2.2 Ternary Compounds (pages 34–35): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.3 via Reactions of Binary Acids of Selenium and Tellurium and their Derivatives by means of response with steel Compounds (pages 35–36): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.4 through response of Oxides of Selenium and Tellurium with steel Compounds (page 37): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.5 by way of Reactions of the Anions and Oxyanions of the weather with steel Compounds (pages 37–38): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6 From Donor Ligands Incorporating the weather Selenium and Tellurium (pages 39–40): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.1.2 Electrochemically pushed Reactions (page 40): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2 by means of Reactions with steel Compounds (pages 40–41): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.1 response with Alkali steel Selenides, Polyselenides, Tellurides, and Polytellurides (pages 41–43): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.2 response with Organochalcogenides (page 43): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.3 response with Organoselenols and Tellurols (page 44): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.4 response with Trimethylsilyl Chalcogenides (pages 45–46): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.5 response with Dialkylselenocarbamates (page 46): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.6 response with Triphenylphosphine Chalcogenides (pages 46–47): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.7 response with Selenocyanate and Selenourea (pages 47–49): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.8 response with Tetrahydroselenophene and Tetrahydrotellurophene and Derivatives (page 49): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.6.2.9 response with Miscellaneous Ligands (pages 49–50): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.7.4.7 by means of response with Selenium or Tellurium Compounds in Metal?Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Mocvd) and comparable Reactions (pages 50–53): E. M. Page
Chapter 3.8.1 advent (pages 54–55): A. D. Norman and W. S. Durfee
Chapter 3.8.2.1.2 through Addition to Low?Valent and Unsaturated steel Complexes (pages 55–58): H. B. Abrahamson
Chapter 3.8.2.1.3 by way of Insertion into Metal–Ligand Bonds (pages 58–63): W. S. Durfee
Chapter 3.8.2.2 From Water (pages 63–64): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.2.2 through Hydrolysis of Transition and internal Transition Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 64–65): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.3 From Hydrogen Peroxide (pages 65–66): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.8.2.3.2 through Oxidation of a Ligand Coordinated to a Transition and internal Transition steel advanced (Insertion response) (pages 66–67): M. T. Pope, R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.4.2 by means of Alcoholysis of Transition and internal Transition Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 67–69): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.4.3 by way of Oxidation of Transition and internal Transition Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 69–70): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.5 From natural Peroxides (page 70): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.8.2.5.2 through Substitution Reactions of Transition and internal Transition Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 70–72): M. T. Pope, R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.6.2 by way of Insertion into Transition and internal Transition Metal?Ligand Bonds: R1R2Co (page 72): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.6.3 through Oxidation of the Transition and internal Transition steel Complexes (Ligand Degradation, Oxygen Abstraction) (pages 72–73): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.7 From Bidentate and Polydentate Oxygen Donor Ligands (Crown Ethers, Macrocycles, 2,4?Pentanedione, etc.) (pages 73–75): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.7.2 by way of Oxidation of Transition and internal Transition steel Complexes (pages 75–76): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.8 From major workforce aspect Oxides (page 76): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.8.2.8.2 via Insertion into Transition and internal Transition steel Bonds (pages 76–77): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.8.2.8.3 by way of Oxidation of Transition and internal Transition Metals and their Compounds (pages 77–78): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.8.2.9 From Oh?, O2?, O?2, and O2?2 (pages 78–79): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.8.2.9.2 via Oxidation of the Transition and internal Transition Metals and their Complexes (page 79): M. T. Pope
Chapter 3.8.2.10 From Alkoxide and Carboxylate Anions (pages 79–82): R. C. Mehrotra and B. S. Saraswat
Chapter 3.8.2.11 From steel Atom and similar Reactions (page 82): ok. J. Klabunde
Chapter 3.8.2.11.2 Oxidative Addition/Complexation Reactions (page 83): okay. J. Klabunde
Chapter 3.8.2.11.3 basic Orbital blending: Dioxygen and Carbon Dioxide with steel Atoms (pages 83–84): ok. J. Klabunde
Chapter 3.8.3 Formation of the Sulfur?Transition and Inner?Transition steel Bond (pages 84–85): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.1.2 via response with the Transition steel and internal Transition steel Compounds (pages 85–86): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.2 From Hydrogen Sulfide, Polysulfides, and Thiols (pages 86–89): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.2.2 via Insertion of Sulfur into Transition and internal Transition Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 89–90): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.2.3 by means of Oxidation of the Transition steel and internal Transition steel Complexes (page 90): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.3 From Thioethers, natural Polysulfides, and different Sulfur Donor Ligands (pages 90–91): J. P. Fackler and ok. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.4 From natural Thioacids, Thiophosphates, Xanthates, and different 1,1?Dithio Compounds (See 3.7.3, desk 1) (page 91): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.4.2 by way of Ligand alternative Reactions with Complexes of the Metals (pages 92–96): J. P. Fackler and ok. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.4.3 through Insertion of Cs2 (or P4S10) into Metal?Ligand Bonds (pages 96–97): J. P. Fackler and ok. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.5 From Bidentate (Excluding 1,1?Dithiols) and Polydentate Sulfur Donor Ligands (pages 97–98): J. P. Fackler and ok. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.5.2 via Ligand Substitution Reactions (page 98): J. P. Fackler and okay. G. Fackler
Chapter 3.8.3.6 From Sulfur Anions (S2?, HS?, S2?X, RS?)?Transition and internal Transition steel Bonds (pages 98–105): T. B. Rauchfuss
Chapter 3.8.3.6.2 With Polysulfido Anions (S2?X) (pages 105–109): T. B. Rauchfuss
Chapter 3.8.3.6.3 With Organosulfur Anions [RS]? (pages 109–115): T. B. Rauchfuss
Chapter 3.8.3.7 From steel Atom and similar Reactions (page 115): okay. J. Klabunde
Chapter 3.8.3.7.2 Oxidative Addition/Complexation Reactions (page 116): ok. J. Klabunde
Chapter 3.8.4 Formation of the Selenium–, Tellurium–, and Polonium–Transition and internal Transition steel Bond (pages 116–123): P. F. Brandt
Chapter 3.9.1 creation (page 124): M. L. Thompson
Chapter 3.9.2 by means of Reactions of Xenon Fluorides and Oxyfluorides with Oxides and Oxysalts (pages 124–127): M. L. Thompson
Chapter 3.9.3 via response of Xenon Fluorides and Oxyfluorides with Oxyacids and their Derivatives1 (pages 127–129): M. L. Thompson
Chapter 3.9.4 Bonds among Oxygen and Krypton or Radon (page 129): M. L. Thompson
Chapter 3.10.1 advent (pages 130–132): A. D. Norman and M. O'Keeffe
Chapter 3.10.1.1.2 exterior Equilibrium with Oxygen Fugacity (pages 132–133): M. O'Keeffe
Chapter 3.10.1.1.3 kinfolk among Nonstoichiometry and actual homes (pages 133–134): M. O'Keeffe
Chapter 3.10.1.2 Nonstoichiometry and Shear Planes (page 134): C. R. A. Catlow
Chapter 3.10.1.2.1 advent (pages 134–135): C. R. A. Catlow
Chapter 3.10.1.2.2 Structural houses (pages 135–137): C. R. A. Catlow
Chapter 3.10.1.2.3 balance (pages 137–141): C. R. A. Catlow
Chapter 3.10.1.3 prolonged Defects (pages 141–143): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.3.2 Tunnel and Pentagonal Column stages (pages 143–146): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.3.3 Chemical Twinning and comparable constructions (pages 146–148): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.4 Coherent Intergrowth (pages 149–150): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.4.2 Disordered prolonged Defects (pages 150–151): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.5 type of Nonstoichiometric Oxides (pages 151–152): A. okay. Cheetham and R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.5.1 Oxide stages with slim Composition levels (pages 152–153): A. ok. Cheetham and R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.5.2 Grossly Nonstoichiometric stages (pages 153–154): A. okay. Cheetham and R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.5.3 Homologous sequence of steel Oxides (page 154): A. ok. Cheetham and R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.5.4 Coherently Intergrown constructions (page 155): A. okay. Cheetham and R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.1.5.5 Oxides with Modulated buildings (pages 155–157): A. okay. Cheetham and R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.2 reliable Bivariant Oxide levels: Nonstoichiometric Oxides right (pages 157–158): L. E. Conroy
Chapter 3.10.2.2 Binary Oxides with a large Composition diversity (pages 158–160): L. Eyring
Chapter 3.10.2.2.2 Oxygen?Deficient, Fluorite?Related constructions: Lanthanide Oxides (Ce, Pr, and Tb larger Oxides) (pages 160–165): L Eyring
Chapter 3.10.2.2.3 Oxygen?Excess Fluorite constructions, UO2+? (pages 165–166): L. Eyring
Chapter 3.10.2.3 a number of Oxides with aspect disorder and disorder advanced Equilibria (pages 166–167): P. ok. Gallagher and E. M. Gundlach
Chapter 3.10.2.3.2 element illness Nonstoichiometry in Spinels and comparable Oxides (pages 167–170): P. ok. Gallagher and E. M. Gundlach
Chapter 3.10.2.3.3 Wide?Range Nonstoichiometry: Perovskite?Derived buildings (pages 170–171): P. ok. Gallagher and E. M. Gundlach
Chapter 3.10.2.3.4 Wide?Range Nonstoichiometry: Oxygen?Deficient Fluorite Structures1,2 (pages 172–173): P. ok. Gallagher and E. M. Gundlach
Chapter 3.10.2.3.5 Wide?Range Nonstoichiometry: combined Cation Oxides; caused Valence results through tremendous Substitution of Cations Having various Valency (pages 173–175): P. ok. Gallagher and E. M. Gundlach
Chapter 3.10.3 Operationally Nonstoichiometric Oxide levels (pages 175–177): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.3.1.2 Reo3?Related constructions; Molybdenum and Tungsten Oxides (pages 177–178): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.3.1.3 Niobium Oxides and comparable constructions (pages 178–182): R. J. D. Tilley
Chapter 3.10.3.2 Nonstoichiometric Layer constitution Oxides (page 182): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.1 Layered Oxides according to the Perovskite constitution (pages 183–184): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.1.2 hot temperature Superconducting Cuprates (pages 184–191): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.1.3 Intergrowth of Perovskite with “Bi2O2” Layers: Aurivillius stages (page 191): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.1.4 Brownmlllerite family members: (Amo3)NAmo2 (pages 192–193): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.1.5 Titanates and Niobates, ANMNO3N+2 and Molybdates, Cs2MoNO3N+1 (pages 193–194): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.2 Oxides in line with the Spinel constitution; Hexagonal Ferrites, ??Alumina Oxide forms, and LiXM2O4 (M = Ti, V, Mn)1?3 (pages 195–196): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.2.2 The ??Alumina kin (pages 196–197): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.2.3 LiXM2O4 (M=Ti,V, Mn) stages (page 197): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.3 Intergrowths of the Cage Oxide A3M3O21 with a Tunnel constitution, A2M6Si4)261 (pages 197–199): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.4 Oxides with Intercalation buildings: Layers equipped up of Edqe?Sharing Octahedra (pages 199–202): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.4.2 HXMoo3: Hydrogen?Intercalated Compounds of Moo3 (pages 202–203): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.4.3 Molybdenum Bronzes AXMoYOZ (pages 203–207): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.4.4 AXMO2 Oxides (pages 207–210): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.4.5 one other relations of AXMo2 Oxides (pages 210–211): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.2.4.6 Titanates and Titanoniobates (or Tantalates) with a Layer constitution (pages 211–214): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3 Tunnel constitution Oxides1–8 (pages 214–215): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.1 Tungsten, Molybdenum Bronzes, and comparable Structures1–8 (pages 215–221): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.2 Titanium Bronzes and comparable Oxides (pages 222–225): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.3 Hollandite, Psilomelane, Ramsdellite, and similar Oxides (pages 225–228): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.4 Vanadium Bronzes with a Three?Dimensional constitution (page 228): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.5 advanced Oxides with Host Lattice equipped up from Octahedra and Tetrahedra (pages 228–229): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.5.1 Phosphate Tungsten Bronzes (PTB) (pages 229–233): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.5.2 Phosphate Niobium Bronzes (PNB) (pages 233–237): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.5.3 Phosphate Molybdenum Oxides (pages 237–239): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.5.4 different diminished Transition steel Phosphates (page 239): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.3.5.5 Siliconiobates, Silicotantalates, and Corresponding Germanium Compounds (pages 239–240): M. Greenblatt and B. Raveau
Chapter 3.10.3.4 Adaptive constructions (pages 240–241): R. S. Roth
Chapter 3.10.3.4.1 Oxides with Vernier?Type Adaption buildings (pages 241–245): R. S. Roth
Chapter 3.10.3.4.2 Double Oxides in response to Tantalum Pentoxide and similar stages (pages 245–249): R. S. Roth
Chapter 3.10.3.4.3 The steel Uranates and similar Oxides (pages 249–250): L. E. Conroy
Chapter 3.10.3.5 combined Valence, combined Anion levels, together with Oxides with Cations of Variable Valence (or combined Cations) Balanced via Substitution of Altervalent Anions (page 250): L. E. Conroy
Chapter 3.11.1 advent (pages 251–252): E. Kaldis
Chapter 3.11.2 Chemical Bonding and edition of actual homes by way of Chemical Parameters (pages 252–253): E. Kaldis
Chapter 3.11.2.2 4f?Transition steel (Rare Earth) Chalcogenides (pages 253–255): E. Kaldis
Chapter 3.11.3 Synthesis and Crystal progress less than managed Thermodynamic Parameters (pages 255–256): E. Kaldis
Chapter 3.11.3.1 keep watch over of Nonstoichiometry (pages 256–259): E. Kaldis
Chapter 3.11.3.2 Chemical Vapor shipping of the Chalcogenides (pages 259–260): E. Kaldis
Chapter 3.11.4 via Reactions in Chalcogen?Hydrogen structures (pages 260–261): P. ok. Dorhout and H. Steinfink
Chapter 3.11.4.2 Of Compounds of Metals (pages 261–262): P. okay. Dorhout and H. Steinfink
Chapter 3.11.5 by way of Precipitation lower than basic and Supercritical stipulations (page 262): P. okay. Dorhout and H. Steinfink
Chapter 3.11.5.1 From Aqueous answer (pages 262–263): P. okay. Dorhout and H. Steinfink
Chapter 3.11.5.2 From Nonaqueous resolution (pages 263–264): P. okay. Dorhout and H. Steinfink
Chapter 3.11.6 via Insertion Reactions from options (pages 264–269): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.1 Layered Transition steel Dichalcogenides (pages 269–273): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.1.2 Unsolvated steel Intercalation Compounds: Posttransition Metals (pages 274–276): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.1.3 Unsolvated steel Intercalation Compounds: Transition Metals (page 276): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.1.4 “Misfit Layer Compounds” (pages 277–278): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.1.5 Solvated stages (pages 278–282): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.1.6 Molecular Intercalation Compounds (pages 282–284): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.1.7 complicated Intercalated Species (pages 284–286): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.2 different Layered Chalcogenides (pages 286–289): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.3 Chain Stuctures (pages 290–292): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6 A Framework buildings (pages 292–293): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.6.4.2 constructions with a Three?Dimensional web of Channels (pages 293–295): A. Lerf
Chapter 3.11.7 by means of Reactions in Melts (pages 295–296): P. ok. Dorhout and H. Steinfink
Chapter 3.11.7.1 In Molten Metals (page 296): P. okay. Dorhout and H. Steinfink
Chapter 3.11.7.2 In Molten Salts (pages 296–297): P. ok. Dorhout and H. Steinfink

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